References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). http://www.cdc.gov/ibd/. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  2. Consumer Health Information Corporation. 7 Quick Tips To 'Take Your Medications As Directed.' http://www.consumer-health.com/services/take-medication-as-directed-quick-tips.php. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  3. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Aminosalicylates. http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/aminosalicylates.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  4. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Antibiotics. http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/antibiotics.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  5. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Crohn's Disease & Ulcerative Colitis: A Guide for Parents. http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/parents_guide_brochure_final.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  6. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: Emotional Factors. http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/emotional.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  7. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Diagnosing and Managing IBD. http://www.ccfa.org/resources/diagnosing-and-managing-ibd.html. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  8. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Diet, Nutrition, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/diet-nutrition-2013.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  9. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Ensuring Care. http://www.ccfa.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/newly-diagnosed/everyday-living.html. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  10. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. IBD 101. http://www.ccfa.org/chapters/midamerica/events/education-2013/pes-2013-abramson.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  11. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. IBS and IBD: Two Very Different Disorders. http://www.ccfa.org/resources/ibs-and-ibd-two-very.html. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  12. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Health Tips. http://online.ccfa.org/site/PageServer?pagename=health_tips_exercise. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  13. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Living with Ucerative Colitis. http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/living_with_uc_brochure_final.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  14. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Managing Flares and Other IBD Symptoms. http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/flares_brochure_final.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  15. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Medications: Biologic Therapy. http://www.ccfa.org/medications-biologic-therapy.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  16. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Teen Guide: Dealing with Crohn's & Colitis. http://www.ccfa.org/resources/teen-guide.html. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  17. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. The Relationship Between Food and IBD. https://www.ibdetermined.org/ibd-information/ibd-diet.aspx. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  18. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Treatment Options. http://www.ccfa.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/newly-diagnosed/treatments.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  19. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Treatment Options in IBD. http://www.ccfa.org/resources/treatment-options-in-ibd.html. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  20. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Types of Ulcerative Colitis. http://www.ccfa.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/what-is-ulcerative-colitis/types-of-ulcerative-colitis.html. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  21. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. Ulcerative Colitis: the A to Z of Treating UC. http://www.ccfa.org/assets/pdfs/ulcerative-colitis-the-a-to-z.pdf. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  22. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. What is Ulcerative Colitis. http://www.ccfa.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/what-is-ulcerative-colitis. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  23. Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. When it Comes to Diet: Know Your Triggers. http://online.ccfa.org/site/PageServer?pagename=health_tips_diet. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  24. Data on file. Rockaway, NJ: Allergan (US), LLC.
  25. Delzicol [package insert]. Parsipanny, NJ: Allergan (US), LLC; 2015.
  26. Genetics Home Reference. Ulcerative colitis. http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/ulcerative-colitis. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  27. Ghosh S, Mitchell R. Impact of inflammatory bowel disease on quality of life: Results of the European Federation of Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis Associations (EFCCA) patient survey. J Crohns Colitis. 2007;1:10-20.
  28. IMS National Prescription Data: 1992-March 2014 (estimate derived from information used under license from IMS Health, Inc., which expressly reserves all rights, including rights of copying, distribution, and republication).
  29. Johns Hopkins Medicine Gastroenterology & Hepatology. Crohn's Disease: Introduction. https://gi.jhsps.org/GDL_Disease.aspx?CurrentUDV=31&GDL_Cat_ID=024CC2E1-2AEB-4D50-9E02-C79825C9F9BF&GDL_Disease_ID=291F2209-F8A9-4011-8094-11EC9BF3100E. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  30. Kornbluth A, Sarchar DB; Practice Parameters Committee of the American College of Gastroenterology. Ulcerative colitis practice guidelines in adults: American College of Gastroenterology, Practice Parameters Committee. Am J Gastroenterol. 2010;105:501-523.
  31. Narula N, Fedorak RN. Exercise and inflammatory bowel disease. Can J Gastroenterol. 2008;22:497-504.
  32. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC). Ulcerative Colitis. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/colitis/index.aspx. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  33. Sninsky CA, Cort DH, Shanahan F, et al. Oral mesalamine (Asacol) for mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis. Ann Intern Med. 1991;115:350-355.
  34. The Mesalamine Study Group. An oral preparation of mesalamine as long-term maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.Ann Intern Med. 1996;124:204-211.
  • Back to the main page
  • See More Important Risk Information

    IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

    Who should not take DELZICOL?

    • Do not take DELZICOL if you are allergic to:
      • salicylates, such as aspirin or medications that contain aspirin
      • aminosalicylates
      • any of the ingredients of DELZICOL

    What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking DELZICOL?

    Tell your healthcare provider if you:

    • Have or have had kidney problems
    • Are allergic to sulfasalazine
    • Have or have had heart-related allergic reactions, such as inflammation of the heart muscle (myocarditis) or inflammation of the lining of the heart (pericarditis)
    • Have or have had liver problems
    • Have or have had a stomach blockage
    • Have any other medical conditions

    What are the possible side effects of DELZICOL?

    DELZICOL may cause serious side effects, including:

    • Kidney problems: Your doctor may check to see how your kidneys are working before taking DELZICOL. It is important to complete all blood tests ordered by your doctor.
    • A condition that may be hard to tell apart from a UC flare: Symptoms include cramping, stomachache, bloody diarrhea, and sometimes fever, headache, and rash. If you experience any of these symptoms while on treatment, call your doctor right away. He or she may tell you to stop taking DELZICOL.
    • Hypersensitivity (allergic) reactions: If signs and symptoms of hypersensitivity occur, immediately call your doctor.
    • Liver failure: In patients that have or have had liver disease.
    • Blood Disorders: Elderly patients and patients taking azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine need to monitor complete blood cell counts and platelet counts while taking DELZICOL.

    The most common side effects of DELZICOL include:

    • Adults: belching, stomachache, constipation, dizziness, runny nose, back pain, rash, upset stomach, and flu symptoms.
    • Children (5 to 17 years of age): inflammation of the nose and pharynx, headache, stomachache, dizziness, inflammation of the sinuses, rash, cough, diarrhea, tiredness, fever, and increased lipase.

    Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of DELZICOL.

    Before starting DELZICOL, tell your doctor about all medications you are taking, including:

    • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and naproxen. Taking these medications with DELZICOL may increase your risk of kidney problems.
    • Azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine. Taking these medications with DELZICOL may increase your risk of blood disorders.

    What is DELZICOL?

    DELZICOL (mesalamine) delayed-release capsules is a prescription medication approved for the treatment of mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis (UC) in patients 5 years of age and older and for the maintenance of remission of UC in adults.

    Please see full Prescribing Information for DELZICOL.

    To report a side effect from one of our products, please call the Allergan Drug Safety Department at 1-800-678-1605.

    ×

    Thank you for visiting

    You are now leaving an Allergan website. A link to a non-Allergan website does not constitute an endorsement of the products or services offered by the non-Allergan website, and Allergan is not responsible for the content of any non-Allergan website.

    ×

    Terms, Conditions, and Eligibility Criteria: